Tracy's blog

I’m Tracy Au and I have graduated from the Professional Writing program from university. I am an aspiring screenwriter, so this blog is used to promote my writing and attract people who will hire me to write for your TV show or movie. I write a lot about writing, TV, movies, jokes, and my daily life and opinions. I have another blog promoting my TV project at www.thevertexfighter.blogspot.com.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

"Foster new approaches with 'red teaming'"/ retain top talent

Jul. 19, 2017 "Foster new approaches with 'red teaming'": Today I found this article by Harvey Schachter in the Globe and Mail:


Bryce Hoffman’s new book focuses on how to achieve a crucial balance between divergent and convergent thinking

Red Teaming By Bryce Hoffman Crown Books, 278 pages, $37

The Roman Catholic Church calls it the devil’s advocate: When Mother Theresa was being considered for beatification, atheists Christopher Hitchens and Aroup Chatterjee were invited to testify against that honour being granted.

For the Israeli Mossad, the country’s intelligence agency, it’s called the 10th man: If nine people in a critical meeting arrive at the same conclusion, the 10th person must disagree, no matter how improbable that line of thinking. For the CIA, it’s the red cell, a group of contrarian thinkers who are urged to challenge conventional wisdom. For the U.S. and Canadian armed forces, it’s called red teaming.

And your company should consider adopting the same concept, ensuring second thought in a time when complexity and psychological biases can get you in deep trouble. “Red teaming works. It works for small California tech start-ups and Japanese wealth funds.

It works for old, iconic corporations and innovative disruptors. It works for nonprofits and hedge funds. And it can work for your company too, if you let it,” consultant and former journalist Bryce Hoffman writes in Red Teaming.

Mr. Hoffman wrote American Icon, about Alan Mulally’s overhaul of Ford Motor Co., in which a critical ingredient was pressing senior executives to continually examine their plans and assumptions, fighting against complacency and group think, which had gripped that company and so many others.

There were no formal red teams – just a no-nonsense CEO. But for many organizations, creating a formal team – whether ad hoc or permanent – makes sense to ensure critical thinking is unleashed.

Ideally, red teaming should begin after a plan has been developed but before it has been approved. You want time to modify it. The red team needs healthy discussion and a free flow of ideas. That is best achieved with divergent thinking, looking at alternatives, which ultimately morphs into convergent thinking. In that vein, a good deal of the book is devoted to sharing techniques to achieve that balance.

Think-write-share involves everyone on the team thinking about the problem and writing down their ideas on index cards before sharing it with others. “By requiring a short amount of time for silent reflection at the beginning, team members have a chance to consider their responses before sharing them with the group.

Writing those responses down is important, too, because it forces people to ‘own’ their answers. It is far easier to equivocate when people are just blurting out the first thing that comes to mind. This method also forces people to pre-commit to an idea and not modify their thinking based on what they hear from the rest of the group,” he explains.

Another technique is “being your own worst enemy,” a roleplaying exercise in which the red team assumes the role of a competitor and tries to figure out how to react to your organization’s plan. Ideally, the effort mimics real life, with the red team fed information in little bits, as your competitor might learn about the situation normally. That shows how your rival might react to counter your efforts.

The devil’s advocacy approach requires the red team to take a belief that is central to your organization’s strategy and develop the most compelling case that the opposite is true. It starts by the red team reviewing all the information the regular staff used to reach its conclusion and, if time, allows the group to conduct its own fact-finding.

“The red team does not have to be right – and just like a high school debate team, it does not have to believe in the position it is taking. The conclusion your organization has already reached may, in fact, be correct. But by conducting a rigorous Devil’s Advocacy analysis, you will find out if that is really the case,” he observes.

Red teaming started to develop its modern popularity after the Israeli military was caught flatfooted in the early days of the 1973 Yom Kippur War, due to a flawed strategy widely and fiercely embraced. The stakes of your own planning may not seem as high but red teaming still makes sense.

This book captures the best ideas of this burgeoning new movement.
Red teaming works. It works for small California tech start-ups and Japanese wealth funds. It works for old, iconic corporations and innovative disruptors. It works for non-profits and hedge funds. And it can work for your company too, if you let it. Bryce Hoffman Consultant, former journalist and author


 "Made in Canada: how to attract and retain top talent": Today I found this article by 
Marie Bountrogianni in the Globe and Mail:

Marie Bountrogianni is dean of the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education at Ryerson University and a former Ontario cabinet minister.

We are living in an employer’s market. New university and college graduates are in strong competition with one another as they enter the job market. Enrolment numbers at Canada’s postsecondary institutions are rising; in 2015, there were over two million students enrolled, compared to 800,000 in 1980. While this increase could be seen as an advantage to many employers, it also presents a considerable, often daunting challenge to organizational recruitment.


Meanwhile, the needs of the labour market are changing. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce recently held a roundtable discussion entitled “Skills for an Automated Future” where I participated as a panelist.

The event was attended by senior-level representatives from both the private and public sector, as well as educators. The results of the discussion were resounding: Canadian businesses and postsecondary institutions need to work more closely than ever to train the highly skilled employees of tomorrow and retain top-tier talent.

Consider the following strategies to attract and recruit top-tier talent at your organization:

Increase opportunities for students

Expand co-op and internship opportunities. An employer survey conducted by Leger Marketing for Universities Canada indicates that 80 per cent of employers identified co-op and internship students as an ideal source for new talent. Moreover, students are keen to learn and eager to acquire on-the-job experience.

The government of Ontario demonstrated a strong commitment to experiential learning when they allocated $190-million over three years to securing workplace opportunities for students through the Career Kick-Start Strategy. Work with universities and colleges to find qualified, dedicated talent.

Start a mentorship or coaching program

Opportunities for mentorship and coaching within the workplace are a big draw for savvy professionals. These kinds of supports will not only help employees develop a different way of thinking, they will inevitably support business growth.

I have heard from employers who fear they will lose employees to higher-paying opportunities after investing resources on them; I encourage these individuals to reconsider this perspective. I know a young professional who is a champion for a bank he left upon being recruited for a data analyst position at a ministry with a higher salary and more direct-reports. Even if this talent does leave, they will be an ambassador for your organization.

Commit to digital literacy

It is no secret that technology is the fastest growing sector in Canada. In the near future, every working professional will be required to have a certain level of digital literacy or competency using digital devices.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) anticipates significant change in the labour market with impending technological innovation; 9 per cent of jobs may be at risk of elimination and 32 per cent may find their job duties changing. Offer workshops or seminars within your organization to help employees develop these skills and prepare themselves for the forthcoming knowledge economy.

Allow employees to grow

Technology is also making it easier to access and customize education. Design an incentive program that funds or subsidizes learning opportunities for your employees. Continuing education programs throughout Canada offer innovative programming that supports adult learners looking to upgrade a skill or learn a new one.

Employees greatly appreciate when organizations are attuned to their professional growth. The Canadian Education & Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC) recently funded the publication of a playbook for career management entitled Retain and Gain, which emphasizes the importance of supporting employee growth. The playbook asserts that highly engaged employees are three times more likely to do something good for their organization. Show employees their value to your organization.

Demonstrate engagement in community

Similar to how employers appreciate job candidates who show goodwill through volunteer experience, discerning professionals appreciate when an organization demonstrates a commitment to community. Sponsor events or programs organized by non-profits, if your organization can afford it.

Alternatively, consider establishing a company-wide day of service where everyone contributes. The 2015 Millennial Report indicates that 70 per cent of millennials volunteered in the previous year and 69 per cent of millennial employees admitted that they would be inclined to make a donation if their organization offered to match part of it. In these times of sociopolitical unrest, there is a general increased appreciation for organizations and leaders who do good. Set a good example for prospective talent.

The strength and prosperity of our country depends on the talented professionals employed in our organizations. Canadian universities and colleges are committed to attracting the best students from both within Canada and from abroad. Let us work together to retain this talent.


Milamarc
2 days ago

Like a few other posts say, Canada really does not have a lot of global industrial champions, and the biggest one remaining, Bombardier, is not really in good shape. Far too many people repeat the mantra about government involvement or Liberals. The reality accross the world, including in societies such as the US, Sweden, Israel, etc., is that government has to have an industrial policy the effect of which is to grow and retain talent.

One of the first place to grow this is in the area of sovereign industrial capabilities for defense. For example, this was made very clear by the new French president, Emmanuel Macron, who will prioritize strategic investments having a dual impact, being defense AND civil or commercial. It is time for politicians, Liberals or others, after 50 years of complacency, to grow up and stop complaining about the US whilst implicitly doing nothing to make sure our advanced graduates in engineering and science stay here. In other words, stop being a colony.



EvanOttawa
2 days ago

Missed the most important problem... over half of Ontario university undergrads are enrolled in Social Sciences/Humanities/General Arts that have little relevance to the job market.
Students are at fault... Many students go to post-secondary-education for "the college experience" (e.g. partying) and take courses for "personal interest", and then whine when it doesn't prepare them for a job. If you want a career, make that the focus of your education.

Universities are also at fault... Ontario universities, for example, graduate 3x more teachers than there are teacher job openings each year. Universities should be accountable for educating their students in the quantities that society actually needs.
Government could help... Subsidize each discipline independently to force universities to scale and balance their faculties.
Like
Sad
7 Reactions



Vote4Me
2 days ago
"Universities should be accountable for educating their students in the quantities that society actually needs."
Wow, you would have worked well with Stalin.
Disagree
Funny
4 Reactions



rf9
2 days ago

In reply to:

Missed the most important problem... over half of Ontario university undergrads are enrolled in Social Sciences/Humanities/General Arts that have little relevance to the job market. Students are...
EvanOttawa
"Students are at fault... "
"Universities are also at fault... "
"Government could help... "
Good God. And you wonder why we suck?



Symmetre
2 days ago

With Liberal tax policies "top talent" will not remain in Canada. Trudeau, Morneau et al have opened the taps for an all-new brain drain. Just watch.
Like
Sad
3 Reactions

Rational Ideas
2 days ago
Exactly. According to Trudeau's and Morneau the way to keep top talent is to put in a special higher tax rate for them and to remove tax deductions (not loop-holes). Right, the racefor the also-rans is on.
Like
1 Reaction


EvanOttawa
2 days ago

In reply to:

With Liberal tax policies "top talent" will not remain in Canada. Trudeau, Morneau et al have opened the taps for an all-new brain drain. Just watch.
Symmetre
Much of Canada's "top talent" moves to California which also has high taxation and a cost of living worst than Ontario!
It's really about career growth and job density...
Career growth: Many Fortune 500 corporations have satellite offices in Canada, but whether you're a manager or an engineer, you'll hit a glass ceiling. You have to work in their head offices to climb the corporate ladder or work on their core projects.
Job density: In Silicon Valley specifically, there are so many major corporations in close proximity, if one lays you off, you can move to their competitor down the street. In Canada, our tech industry is more spread out, so switching jobs often means uprooting your family and moving to another city.
Like
Sad
6 Reactions



Grekoff
2 days ago
Some truths about Canada:
(1) we are a services economy that is subsidized by natural resources
(2) we pride our culture on tolerance, but are in denial about our aversion to risk. That bodes poorly for fostering an environment of entrepreneurship.
(3) public sector job growth has far exceeded private sector job growth
With tax rates being high, stable lifelong government jobs plentiful, and lots of natural resources to ensure our quality of life stays high, there's little incentive to go beyond mediocrity and cultivate talent.
Like
Sad
6 Reactions



JavierSantos
1 day ago

I think Canada is facing the great opportunity to take a leadership role and reinvent how employers relate to employees. With so much technology to rule our lives, we have lost the Human side of business. Employers need to relate to employees in a different way. The strength of the relationships at work is what keeps you engaged. Stop throwing old solutions to new problems. Build relationships at work, face to face, play together, allow people to bring their whole self to work, let them be themselves and they will be loyal and authentic in return.




Mousaka
2 days ago

I am not sure why this person is writing this as all she did was reiterate what she was told with no experience in actually partaking in the activities the tile suggests, Great topic but why not have someone who is actually involved in this area speak about it. Simple vanilla descriptions being regurgitated from a person not involved in the private sector doesn't cut it.
Like
3 Reactions



T Rogers
2 days ago

The best way for Canadian companies to retain top talent, is to open a branch office in the USA.
Funny
1 Reaction



BERNIE600
2 days ago

HI:Our relatively high standard of living is totally supported buy our natural resource base.This has been generational.
We need to grow our own populations knowledge base but that requires more MIT's in Canada.
Nothing "wrong" with studying ancient civilizations but seeing how to breakdown the human genome to make "custom" medication (addressing protein-coding DNA genes) would help our GDP .
As soon as I had my masters (my under grad was Engineering) I had job offers from the US that eclipsed what I had in Canada and not just from a dollar point of view.
Canada is a great place to be but for how long.....
Sad
1 Reaction


fried onions
2 days ago

‘Made in Canada: How to attract and retain top talent.’ How about start by making it a place where top talent would like to hang their hat? Think the oligopolies that have free reign to rip off Canadian consumers left right and center is a good way to go about this? How about the excessive tax rates that Canadians are saddled with? The mediocre health care system would be a hard sell for top talent. What about the long dark cold winters? Ok, that’s a tough one to fix.
Like
Disagree
3 Reactions



Grekoff
2 days ago

More fluff from a former McGuinty cabinet minister.
Funny
Like
5 Reactions

IslandReader
2 days ago

Those who can not do teach.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home